Condition of the Month – (Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction )

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Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction occurs when one or both of the sacroiliac joints loses normal motion. Learn more about this condition on the blog.

Your sacroiliac joint is the mechanical link on each side of your hip that connects your legs to the rest of your body. The joint has a limited but very important degree of mobility. Symptoms develop when one or both of the joints loses normal motion. When a joint becomes “restricted”, a self-perpetuating cycle of discomfort follows. Restriction causes the muscles to become overworked, leading to tightness, compression, inflammation, pain and more restriction.

Sacroiliac problems can happen as a result of repetitive strenuous activity or trauma- like a fall onto the buttocks. Other causes of sacroiliac joint problems include, poor posture, having one leg slightly longer than another, having an altered gait, having flat feet or scoliosis, or having pain somewhere else in your legs. Pregnancy is a common trigger for sacroiliac joint problems due to weight gain, gait changes and postural stress.

Sacroiliac joint problems often begin as a focal discomfort in your back just below the belt line, slightly to one side of center. Your pain can travel into your buttock or thigh. Symptoms are often worse by standing on the affected side. The pain may become more apparent when you change positions- like exiting a chair, car or bed, or during long car rides. The pain is often relieved by lying down.

To assist with your recovery, you should avoid any activity that provokes pain, like standing on the affected leg or prolonged sitting. Our office may suggest a sacroiliac support belt to help stabilize your joint.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, be sure to call us for an evaluation.

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