An Open Letter to our Medical friends.

462

In the past year, many trusted medical establishments including the FDA (1), CDC (2), Joint Commission (3,4), JAMA (5), and The American College of Physicians/ Annals of Internal Medicine (6) have encouraged medical providers to prescribe spinal manipulation as a first line treatment for acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain.

Most recently, The Lancet echoed that endorsement, and provided a unique perspective:

The reduced emphasis on pharmacological care recommends nonpharmacological care as the first treatment option and reserves pharmacological care for patients for whom nonpharmacological care has not worked. These guidelines endorse the use of exercise and a range of other non- pharmacological therapies, including massage, spinal manipulation, and acupuncture.

Gaps between evidence and practice exist, with limited use of recommended first- line treatments and inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery. Doing more of the same will not reduce back-related disability or its long-term consequences. The advances with the greatest potential are arguably those that align practice with the evidence. (7)

Unfortunately, personal experience skews our perception of each other’s merit, i.e., we primarily see each other’s failures since the successes don’t need to seek additional care. Regardless of our professional degree, we all have failed cases mixed into our many clinical successes. We must not lose sight of the evidence supporting each other’s overwhelming proven value for a given diagnosis. If we judge each other by our successes rather than our failures, we will work toward an integrated model where the patient wins. Together, we will help more patients than either working alone.

We are honored for the opportunity to co-manage your patients.

 

References
1. FDA Education Blueprint for Health Care Providers Involved in the Management or Support of Patients with Pain. May 2017. Accessed on May 12, 2017
2. Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain- United States, 2016. MMWR Recomm Rep 2016;65(No. RR-1):1–49.
3. The Official Newsletter of The Joint Commission. Joint Commission Enhances Pain Assessment and Management Requirements for Accredited Hospitals. July 2017 Volume 37 Number 7. Ahead of print in
2018 Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals.
4. Joint Commission Online. Revision to Pain Management Standards. http://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/23/jconline_november_12_14.pdf
5. Paige NM, Miake-Lye IM, Booth MS, et al. Association of Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Clinical Benefit and Harm for Acute Low Back Pain; Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA. 2017;317(14):1451-1460.
6. Qaseem A, et al. for the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(7):514-530.
7. Foster, Nadine EBuchbinder, Rachelle et al. Prevention and treatment of low back pain: evidence, challenges, and promising directions. The Lancet, Published Online March 21, 2018 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ S0140-6736(18)30489-6

What does a shoulder separation actually mean?

Impingement

The term “acromioclavicular sprain” means that you have damaged the strong fibrous bands (ligaments) that hold the end of your collarbone (clavicle) to the tip of your shoulder blade (scapula). Another term sometimes used to describe this injury is “shoulder separation.” 40-50% of all athletic shoulder injuries involve the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. AC injuries are common in adolescents and young adults who participate in contact sports, like hockey and football. Males are affected five times more often than females.

Injuries may range from mild fraying of a single ligament to complete rupture of all of the supporting ligaments. Significant tears can allow your collarbone to move upward, out of its normal position, creating a raised bump under your skin. AC joint injuries are categorized (Grade 1-Grade 6) based upon the amount of damage. Grade 1 injuries are tender without joint separation. Grade 2 injuries may be accompanied by a slight separation of the joint. Grade 3 and above will show significant joint separation.

Injuries typically occur following a fall onto the point of your shoulder, while your arm is at your side, or by falling onto your outstretched hand. You will most likely feel pain and swelling on the very top of your shoulder. More significant injuries may produce bruising or a visible “bump” beneath the skin. Moving your shoulder will likely be painfully limited for a while.

Your treatment will vary, depending upon the severity of your injury. Grade 1, 2, and most Grade 3 injuries are best managed conservatively. A sling may be used only when needed to control painful movements. Initially, you will need to limit activity, especially reaching overhead, behind your back, or across your body. The exercises described below are an important part of your rehab and should be performed consistently to avoid long-term problems. Using an ice pack for 10-15 minutes each hour may help to limit swelling and pain.

Some mild separations will heal by themselves within a week or two. More significant injuries can take longer, and disabilities typically range between one and eight weeks. Patients who have suffered a significant amount of ligament damage may have a permanent bump on their shoulder, regardless of treatment. This bump does not usually cause ongoing problems.

If you or someone you know suffers from this condition, call our office today. Our doctors are experts at relieving many types of pain including shoulder injuries.

AC Joint

Advertisements

Diet & Exercise Tip Of The Month

Exercise Tip

Have you ever started a new exercise program and then suddenly gained a few

pounds? Don’t fret. It’s normal! Exercise is a stress on your body, which creates micro

tears in your muscles, and the inflammation from those tears will cause you to retain

more water. Your body will also start to store more glycogen in your muscles to make

sure you have plenty of fuel to burn during your next workout. Those two things will

cause a temporary weight gain when you first start working out. A better way to track

your progress will always be to take measurements. If you’re losing inches, you’re

winning!

“I Popped A Rib”

You have 12 pair of ribs that attach to the “thoracic” region of your spine. The ribs serve to protect your heart, lungs, and other vital organs. Each rib is shaped much like a “bucket handle” arching from your spine to your breastbone (sternum) in front. Your ribs must move freely when you breathe, bend, twist, and reach. The term “costovertebral dysfunction” means that one or more of your ribs has become restricted or slightly malpositioned from it’s attachment to the spine.

You can visualize this as imagining one of your bucket handles is misaligned and not moving in sync with the others.

Rib problems can develop in many ways. Sometimes they are brought on by an accident or injury; other times, they develop from repetitive strains or poor posture. Rib malpositions are common during pregnancy or after a whiplash injury.

Symptoms sometimes begin following a sudden or explosive movement, like coughing or sneezing, reaching, pushing, or pulling. Other times, a specific cause cannot be recalled. Rib dysfunction may cause pain near or slightly to the side of your spine with possible radiation of symptoms along your rib, sometimes all the way to the front. Some patients feel as though they were “shot by an arrow.” Rib problems are a frequently overlooked source of chest and abdominal pain.

Be sure to tell your chiropractor if your symptoms include any unusual cough, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, fever, flu-like complaints or if you notice a rash developing along the border of your rib. Seek immediate medical treatment if you notice chest “pressure” or “squeezing”, symptoms that radiate into your arm and jaw, or if you have chest pain or shortness of breath with exertion, as these are possible symptoms of heart problems and must be addressed immediately.

Most patients report rapid relief following chiropractic care. Our office can provide several tools to help ease your pain. To speed your recovery, you should avoid activities that increase your pain. Initially, you may need to limit reaching, pushing, and pulling. Women may benefit by temporarily switching to a sports bra to help better diffuse pressure over irritated ribs. Some patients report relief by using sports creams, NSAIDs, or applying ice for 15-20 minutes directly over the painful area.

Its a syndrome; that must be bad, right?

Your lower back is made up of five blocks of bone (vertebra) stacked on top of each other with a shock absorbing “disc” in between each level for flexibility. The larger front of the vertebra is called the “body”. The back of each vertebra is formed by two smaller bony columns (one on each side), capped with smooth joints called “facets”. Each vertebra rests on the one below in a “tripod” sort of fashion with the disc in front, and the facet joints in the back. The diagnosis of “facet syndrome” means that your facet joints have become irritated and inflamed. This problem can arise from sprains, strains, or joints that are not moving properly. Patients are more likely to develop facet syndrome if they have suffered an injury, overuse their back, have arthritis, or are overweight.
When a facet is irritated, you will likely notice pain on one side of your back that may radiate into your flank, hip, and thigh. The pain may come and go. Your pain may increase when you arch backwards or return to an upright position after bending forward. Many patients report relief when they lie down. Symptoms of facet syndrome do not usually radiate past your knee. Be sure to tell your chiropractor if your symptoms include any radiation of pain below your knee, weakness, groin numbness, changes in bowel or bladder function, or if you have a fever.

Long-standing irritation to the facet joint is thought to cause arthritis. Fortunately, our office can help. To speed your recovery, you should wear supportive shoes and avoid activities that increase your symptoms. Be sure to take frequent breaks from sitting. Your doctor may provide specific recommendations about using heat or ice at home. You may need to limit heavy physical activity, but you should avoid complete bed rest. Yoga has been shown to help back pain sufferers, so consider joining a class or picking up a DVD.

Bryan Cobb RMT.

Since 2005, Bryan has been dedicated to helping all people with chronic and acute pain caused by soft-tissue damage.

His training and experience make him uniquely qualified to treat a wide variety of pain and dysfunction and to give instruction on prevention and self-care.

Bryan is the only Massage Therapist in Manitoba — and one of the few in Canada — to be certified by the Certification Board for Myofascial Trigger Point Therapists (CBMTPT).

Bryan holds a degree as an Advanced Remedial Massage Therapist (ARMT) from the Massage Therapy College of Manitoba.  Course work at MTCM includes
• over 2,000 hours of practice, as well as
• intensive course work,
• a supervised clinical practicum, and
• community outreach placements.

MTCM has a credit transfer affiliation with the University of Winnipeg, ensuring that its courses are held to the highest level.  When Bryan studied at MTCM, the college was the only massage therapy college in western Canada accredited by the Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation.  Today, the college is a member of the Canadian Council of Massage Therapy Schools.

Bryan is a member in good standing of the Natural Health Practitioners of Canada.

Bryan also has a background in Anatomy, Exercise Physiology, and Sport Sciences from the University of Manitoba, and he has worked as a personal trainer and fitness leader.

He is an avid natural bodybuilder and fitness enthusiast, and has a blue belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu.

Meralgia paresthetica? Yeah, we know all about it.

Meralgia paresthetica is an often missed diagnosis for tingling, numbness, and burning pain on the front and outside of your thigh. The condition is caused by a pinching or irritation to the “lateral femoral cutaneous nerve” that supplies sensation to your thigh.
This nerve can be compressed beneath a ligament, tendon or tight muscle in your hip and pelvis. Pregnancy or being even slightly overweight makes this condition more likely. Tight clothing including girdles, compressive shorts, or tight belts may aggravate or cause this condition. Carpenters’ tool belts or police duty belts may compress this nerve. Prolonged sitting or lying in a fetal position may aggravate this problem. Diabetics are at greater risk.

In the early stages of this condition, your symptoms are usually mild and intermittent. Walking or standing may aggravate the symptoms, and sitting tends to relieve them. In more advanced stages, numbness and tingling changes to shooting pain that is unaffected by your position.

The central goal of treatment is to decrease any cause of compression. In some cases, simply wearing looser clothing or belts may help relieve your symptoms. Some men find relief by switching from a belt to suspenders. Avoid wearing a tool belt or duty belt that places pressure over the area. If you are overweight, begin a sensible weight loss program to avoid compression from excessive tissue.

Condition of the Month: A/C Separation

AC

A/C Separation

The term “acromioclavicular sprain” means that you have damaged the strong fibrous bands (ligaments) that hold the end of your collarbone (clavicle) to the tip of your shoulder blade (scapula). Another term sometimes used to describe this injury is “shoulder separation.” 40-50% of all athletic shoulder injuries involve the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. AC injuries are common in adolescents and young adults who participate in contact sports, like hockey and football. Males are affected five times more often than females.

Injuries may range from mild fraying of a single ligament to complete rupture of all of the supporting ligaments. Significant tears can allow your collarbone to move upward, out of its normal position, creating a raised bump under your skin. AC joint injuries are categorized (Grade 1-Grade 6) based upon the amount of damage. Grade 1 injuries are tender without joint separation. Grade 2 injuries may be accompanied by a slight separation of the joint. Grade 3 and above will show significant joint separation.

Injuries typically occur following a fall onto the point of your shoulder, while your arm is at your side, or by falling onto your outstretched hand. You will most likely feel pain and swelling on the very top of your shoulder. More significant injuries may produce bruising or a visible “bump” beneath the skin. Moving your shoulder will likely be painfully limited for a while.

Your treatment will vary, depending upon the severity of your injury. Grade 1, 2, and most Grade 3 injuries are best managed conservatively. A sling may be used only when needed to control painful movements. Initially, you will need to limit activity, especially reaching overhead, behind your back, or across your body. The exercises described below are an important part of your rehab and should be performed consistently to avoid long-term problems. Using an ice pack for 10-15 minutes each hour may help to limit swelling and pain.

Some mild separations will heal by themselves within a week or two. More significant injuries can take longer, and disabilities typically range between one and eight weeks. Patients who have suffered a significant amount of ligament damage may have a permanent bump on their shoulder, regardless of treatment. This bump does not usually cause ongoing problems.

If you or someone you know suffers from this condition, call our office today. Our doctors are experts at relieving many types of pain including shoulder injuries.