Five Clever Ways to Add Exercise to Your Day

5 exercise ways

Great tips to optimize your health without a lot of extra work.

https://www.phillyvoice.com/how-to-add-exercise-your-day-fitness-059991/

Advertisements

Low Back Pain Treatment

back pain

The US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality recently published acomprehensive review of more than 218 prior studies on non-drug treatments for chronic pain. The researchers found that for chronic low back pain, spinal manipulation and exercise led to sustained improvements in pain and function. Check out this video to learn more about how chiropractic care relieves back pain.

Skelly AC et al. Noninvasive Nonpharmacological Treatment. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 2018 Jun. Report No.: 18-EHC013-EF.

Condition Of The Month

Achilles Tendonitis

achilles

Your Achilles tendon is the strong fibrous band of tissue that connects your calf muscles to your heel. The tendon is named after “Achilles” who was a powerful, yet vulnerable warrior in Greek mythology. Likewise, our Achilles tendon, being the largest and strongest tendon in the body, is susceptible to injury from the high demands placed on it. (Running can generate forces over 12 times your body weight on the Achilles tendon.)

The tendon may be strained or even ruptured from excessive stretch or forceful contraction of the calf muscles. More commonly, the tendon is repeatedly overloaded and suffers tiny “micro tears.” Damage usually occurs either directly behind the heel, or near the weakest area of the tendon- one to two inches above the heel.

Achilles tendon injuries affect between 250,000 and 1 million people per year. Most are middle-aged males, between the age of 30 and 50. Interestingly, Achilles tendon injuries occur more frequently on the left side. If you have suffered a prior Achilles tendon injury, you are at greater risk of injuring the opposite side. Two-thirds of all Achilles tendon injuries involve athletes. Runners are up to 10 times more likely to suffer Achilles tendon problems. You may at increased risk if the arch of your foot is too high or too flat.

Symptoms may begin abruptly following a strain but more commonly develop slowly from repeated irritation. Morning pain and stiffness are common. Your symptoms will likely increase with activity, especially walking or running. You may notice pain when you rise up on your toes. Walking down stairs stretches the tendon and usually increases symptoms. Some patients notice that the irritated area becomes firmly swollen. Ongoing irritation to the spot on your heel where the tendon inserts can cause a painfully elevated “pump bump.”

Research has shown that conservative care, like the type provided in this office, can produce “excellent results” in over 85% of patients. Initially, you may need to limit or stop activities that cause pain. Runners may need to switch to swimming or cycling for a short period of time. Be sure to introduce new activities slowly and avoid increasing your activity by more than 10% per week. Runners should begin on a smooth, shock- absorbent surface and start at a low intensity – first increasing distance, then pace. Avoid training on hard or unlevel surfaces like hills. Make sure you warm up properly and avoid over training. Avoid wearing high heels or shoes with an excessively rigid heel tab. One of the most important and effective treatments for Achilles tendinopathy is performing “heel drop exercises” as outlined below.

If you experience any of these symptoms, give our office a call.

Trigger points in the vastus Lateralis

The vastus lateralis muscle is one of the quadriceps muscles of the thigh. It originates on the greater trochanter, intertrochanteric line, and linea aspera of the femur. It inserts on the Patella via the quadriceps tendon and tibial tuberosity via the patellar ligament. It’s main function is to extend the knee. Trigger points in this muscle refer pain all along the lateral thigh and into the lateral knee.

Trigger points In the rectus abdominis muscle.

the rectus abdominis muscle is your “six pack” muscle. It originates on the pubic bone, and inserts on the costal cartilage of ribs 5-7, and the xiphoid process of the sternum.its main actions are to flex and rotate the spine, and to increase intra-abdominal pressure. This muscle is often tight in people who slouch, or have a posteriorly tilted pelvis. In people with an anteriorly rotated pelvis this muscle is often weak and needs to be strengthened. Trigger points in this muscle refer pain into the mid and lower back