Trigger points in the trapezius muscle.

The trapezius muscle is a large diamond shaped muscle located in your back. This muscle is often overloaded due to poor sitting posture or excessive exercise. When this occurs trigger points will form. These points can cause back, neck, and shoulder pain. Trigger points in the upper traps are a leading cause of headache.

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Fibromyalgia Diet?

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Folks suffering with fibromyalgia (FM) commonly complain that certain foods can make their symptoms worse. How common is this? One study reported 42% of FM patients found that certain foods worsened their symptoms!

Because FM affects each person differently, there is no ONE FM diet or, “…one size fits all” when it comes to eating “right” for FM. Patients with FM usually find out by trial and error which foods work vs. those that consistently don’t. However, remembering which foods do what can be a challenge so FIRST, make a three column FOOD LOG with the following headings: BETTER, NO CHANGE, WORSE. This will allow you to QUICKLY review the list as a memory refresher.

According to Dr. Ginevra Liptan, medical director of the Frida Center for Fibromyalgia (Portland, OR) and author of Figuring Out Fibromyalgia: Current Science and the Most Effective Treatments, there are some common trends she’s observed through treating FM patients. Here are some of her recommendations:

PAY ATTENTION TO HOW FOOD MAKES YOU FEEL: It is quite common to have “sensitivities” to certain foods, but this is highly variable from person to person. Examples of problematic foods/ingredients include: MSG (commonly used in Chinese food), other preservatives, eggs, gluten, and dairy. Dr. Liptan HIGHLY recommends the food journal approach! She also recommends including a note about the type of symptoms noticed with each “WORSE” food, as symptoms can vary significantly.

ELIMINATE CERTAIN FOODS: If you suspect a certain food may be problematic, try an elimination challenge diet. That means STOP eating that food for six to eight weeks and then ADD it back into your diet and see how you feel. Remember, FM sufferers frequently have irritable bowel syndrome, also known as IBS, and this approach can be REALLY HELPFUL! Food allergies may be part of the problem, and your doctor may refer you for a consult with an allergist and/or a dietician. They will also discuss the “anti-inflammatory diet” with you.

EAT HEALTHY: In general, your diet should emphasize fruits and vegetables and lean protein. Pre-prepare food so you have something “healthy” to reach for rather than a less healthy snack when you’re hungry and tired. Consider “pre-washed” and pre-cut up vegetables; try quinoa rather than pasta. Consume anti-fatigue foods and eat multiple small meals daily vs. one to two large meals. Protein snacks (like a hardboiled egg or oatmeal – GLUTEN FREE) help a lot! Eat breakfast and include protein. Also, GET ENOUGH SLEEP (at least seven to eight hours and be consistent)!

SUPPLEMENTS: Consider a good general multi-vitamin, calcium and magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D3, and Co-Enzyme Q10. There are others, but this represents a great place to start. Remember to check any medication you may be taking with these/any suggestions before taking supplements!

If you, a friend or family member requires care for Fibromyalgia, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services!

Fibromyalgia and Sleep

Is there a connection between fibromyalgia (FM) and sleep disturbance? Let’s take a look!

FM is a condition that causes widespread pain and stiffness in muscles and joints. Patients with FM often experience chronic daytime fatigue and some type of sleep problems like getting to sleep, staying asleep, and/or feeling restored in the morning upon waking. The National Institutes of Health estimates between 80-90% of those diagnosed with FM are middle-aged women, although it can affect men and happen at any age. As little as 10-20 years ago, it was hard to find a doctor who “believed” in FM, and it was common for the patient to be told that their pain “was all in their head.” FM has now been studied to the point that we know it is a real condition, and it affects between 2-6% of the general population around the world.

It is well established that sleep disturbance frequently occurs after surgery, which usually normalizes as time passes. One study used a group of healthy women who were deprived of sleep (particularly slow wave sleep) for three days to see if there was a link between sleep disturbance and pain. Results confirmed that the women experienced a decrease in pain tolerance and increased levels of discomfort and fatigue after three days—the same symptoms found among FM sufferers!

Fibromyalgia may have NO known cause, or it can be triggered by other conditions such as repetitive stress injuries, car crash injuries, and other forms of trauma. FM also appears to run in families though it’s still NOT clear if this is a true genetic link or caused by shared environmental factors. Some feel FM is a rheumatoid condition, and though FM is NOT a true form of arthritis, it has been found that people with arthritis are more likely to have FM.

FM sufferers frequently suffer from conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine headaches, arthritis, lupus, and major depressive disorders. Approximately 20% of FM patients have depression and/or anxiety disorders, and a link between chronic pain and depression exists and seems to play a role in people’s perception of pain.

Because conditions such as sleep apnea can result in symptoms similar to FM, it’s recommended that patients suspected of FM keep a sleep/sleepiness diary in order to rule out sleep apnea as a cause for their condition.

There are many “tips” for improving sleep quality, which we will dive into next month, as these may prove VERY HELPFUL in the management of FM!

If you, a friend or family member requires care for Fibromyalgia, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services!

Trigger points in the gluteus Maximus muscle.

The gluteus Maximus muscle makes up your buttock. It’s is a powerful hip extensor and thus used heavily during activities such as walking, running, and climbing up stairs. Most atheletes abuse this muscle. When overworked trigger points will form, and these points will cause pain to be felt in the hip, sacrum and the as well as deep in the gluteal area. Litterally a pain in the butt!! Trigger points won’t release on their own and require interventions like trigger point massage.

Fibromyalgia sleep tips

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Last month, we discussed the connection between sleep disturbance and the presence of widespread pain found with fibromyalgia (FM). This month’s topic will center on how we can improve our sleep quality with the goal of feeling restored upon waking in the morning!

1)  NOISE & LIGHT: Block out noise with earplugs or a sound machine and light with window blinds, heavy curtains, and/or an eye mask. The light emanating from the LED or LCD from TVs, DVRs, or stereos has been found to suppress the pineal gland’s melatonin production (the “sleep hormone”) and thus can interfere with sleep, so try to keep them away from the bedroom. However, a small night light can assist for nighttime bathroom callings!

2) FOOD: Avoid large meals at least two hours before bedtime. Try a glass of milk, yogurt, or a small protein snack if hunger overcomes you. Milk is unique as it contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which studies show, helps people sleep!

3)  EXERCISE: Aerobic exercise during the day is HIGHLY therapeutic. It reduces stress, reduces pain, reduces depression, and wakes us up! Avoid heavy exercise within three hours before bedtime. Exercise on a REGULAR basis to promote high-quality deep sleep.

4)  SLEEP HABITS: Develop good sleeping habits by going to bed at a regular time. Avoid napping in the late afternoon. A “POWER NAP” of no more than 10-15 minutes, ideally about eight hours after waking, is a GOOD THING as it can help you feel refreshed.

5)  MENTAL TASKS: Avoid mentally stimulating activity one hour before bedtime to calm the brain.

6)  MENTAL CLARITY: Avoid bedtime worries. Try NOT to think about things that are upsetting. Substitute positive thoughts, experiences, and/or visualize favorite hobbies that free up the mind. Try to avoid discussing emotional issues before bedtime.

7)  PETS: They are GREAT companions but NOT in the bed at night! Not only can pets kicking and moving disturb rest, their dander can stir up allergies and interfere with sleep.

8)  TEMPERATURE: A well-ventilated and temperature controlled (54-74° F or 12.2-23.3° Celsius) bedroom is “key.”

9)  BEDROOM “RULES”: The bedroom is for two things: physical intamacy and sleeping. If you wake up in the middle of the night, go to another room and read a book or watch TV until you feel sleepy.

10)  AVOID STIMULANTS: AVOID nicotine, caffeine, coffee, chocolate, tea, soft drinks, and various over-the-counter or prescription medications in the late evening, unless under instruction from your physician.

11)  RELAXATION TECHNIQUES: Try one (there are many) and practice it at bedtime.

12)  REFRAIN FROM DRINKING ALCOHOL: Alcohol is a nervous system depressant and can HELP you fall asleep, BUT a rebound withdrawal can cause nightmares and night sweats. Avoid this close to bedtime (switch to water!).

If you, a friend or family member requires care for Fibromyalgia, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services!

What are some good exercises for Fibro?

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Fibromyalgia (FM) is a very common, chronic condition where the patient describes “widespread pain” not limited to one area of the body. Hence, when addressing exercises for FM, one must consider the whole body. Perhaps one of the most important to consider is the squat.

If you think about it, we must squat every time we sit down, stand up, get in/out of our car, and in/out of bed. Even climbing and descending steps results in a squat-lunge type of movement.

The problem with squatting is that we frequently lose (or misuse) the proper way to do this when we’re in pain as the pain forces us to compensate, which can cause us to develop faulty movement patterns that can irritate our ankles, knees, hips, and spine (particularly the low back). In fact, performing a squatting exercise properly will strengthen the hips, which will help protect the spine, and also strengthens the glutel muscles, which can help you perform all the daily activities mentioned above.

The “BEST” type of squat is the free-standing squat. This is done by bending the ankles, knees, and hips while keeping a curve in the low back. The latter is accomplished by “…sticking the butt out” during the squat.

Do NOT allow the knees to drift beyond your toes! If you notice sounds coming from your knees they can be ignored IF they are not accompanied by pain. If you do have pain, try moving the foot of the painful knee about six inches (~15 cm) ahead of the other and don’t squat as far down. Move within “reasonable boundaries of pain” by staying away from positions that reproduce sharp, lancinating pain that lingers upon completion.

There are MANY exercises that help FM, but this one is particularly important!

Trigger point massage

Session Description

 

A treatment with Bryan is very user friendly. And, no, you don’t have to remove any clothing. However, bringing a t-shirt and a pair of shorts or sweats is recommended.

 

The first time you come for a treatment you will be asked to fill out a Client History form. Bryan will go over the information you provide, asking for more detail and discussing the type of pain you are having and its location.

 

The treatment itself involves locating the Trigger Points in the muscle or soft tissue and applying a deep focused pressure to the Point. This will reproduce the pain and the referral pattern that is characteristic of that pain.

 

The treatment will be uncomfortable at first, but as the Trigger Points release, the pain will decrease. The pressure will always be adjusted to your tolerance level. If, at any time, you feel too uncomfortable you can ask Bryan to ease off a bit.

 

Depending on your specific problem, Bryan may also use some stretching and / or range-of-motion techniques, as needed.

 

After treatment, it is usually recommended that the client apply moist heat to the area treated.