Kneecap Pain

Patellofemoral syndrome is an irritation of the articular surface between the kneecap and the femur, your thigh bone, that causes pain under and around the kneecap.

Climbing stairs, running and walking for a prolonged period of time often increases pain. Pain can also be felt after sitting for a long time or squatting.

Patellofemoral pain is more prevalent among young women than men, and more prevalent in the active population.

Patellofemoral syndrome can cause, but is not limited to, pain at the front of the knee, difficulty with weight-bearing and squatting and sometimes swelling. Pain can also irradiate under and around the knee. Creaking or grinding sensations can occur during physical activity.

Treatment of Patellofemoral Syndrome consists of Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanics stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the area. 

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Pain on the inside of the knee?

Pes anserine bursitis is the irritation of the bursa on the inside of the tibia, near the knee joint. This bony area constitutes an insertion zone for three muscles: the sartorius, the gracilis and the semitendinosus.

Sports and activities that require these muscles to be repeatedly contracted or stretched while running, hiking, or any other extended activity can cause irritation of the bursa and sometimes inflammation. Pes anserine bursitis may be associated with an injury to the tendons in that area. It can occur as a result of trauma directly to the knee. Muscle imbalance in the hip or knee may also contribute to the onset of symptoms.

Pes anserine bursitis can produce, but is not limited to pain on the inside of the knee, localized edema due to swelling of the bursa and reduced mobility in the knee. Symptoms are usually worse while running, walking on a sloping surface and climbing stairs.

Treatment of hamstring injuries consists of Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanics stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the area. 

#LaserTherapy
#KneeInjuries
#Winnipeg
#Chiropractic
#LegInjury

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Jumper’s Knee

Patellar tendinitis, also known as jumper’s knee, is an injury that usually occurs when the patellar tendon is subjected to significant repetitive or prolonged overload. This overload causes irritation of the tendon and it can become painful.

This condition mainly affects people who perform activities involving jumping, running, or speeding.

Typically, this injury occurs during a period where training intensity and/or volume has been increased too quickly with inadequate recovery.

The patellar tendon is the main structure involved in this condition. This tendon is a band of connective tissue whose function is to attach the lower part of the patella to the tibia. It is tensed when thigh muscles, such as the quadriceps, contract during activity, or in positions where the knee is bent.

Patellar tendinopathy can produce, but is not limited to, pain in the front of the knee, difficulty in weight bearing and squatting, and swelling.

Treatment of jumper’s knee consists of Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanics stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the area. 

#LaserTherapy
#KneeInjuries
#Winnipeg
#Chiropractic
#SportsInjury
#Athlete

Patellar Bursitis

Patellar bursitis is the irritation of the bursa in the front of the knee, just below the kneecap. It is covered by the patellar tendon that connects the kneecap to the tibia.

Sports and activities that require the quadriceps muscles to be repeatedly contracted or stretched while running, hiking, or any other extended activity can cause irritation of the bursa and sometimes inflammation. Patellar bursitis may also occur as a result of trauma directly to the knee.

Patellar bursitis can produce, but is not limited to, pain in the front of the knee, localized edema due to swelling of the bursa and reduced mobility in the knee. Symptoms are usually worse while running, walking on a sloping surface, climbing and descending stairs, and squatting.

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Big Bump On Your Knee?

Osgood-Schlatter disease is a common condition that affects the knee joint in growing, active children and adolescents.

It corresponds to an inflammation of the patellar tendon and the tibial tuberosity, where the tendon attaches to the tibia. Over time, this inflammation causes a bump under the kneecap and creates pain in the front of the knee. The pain is often increased with activity and usually improves with rest.

Osgood-Schlatter disease is a consequence of overuse, commonly seen in sports that require a lot of running, jumping and pivoting such as football, basketball and gymnastics.

This condition usually occurs in children and adolescents whose bones are not fully developed, most often in women between the ages of 8 and 13 and in men between the ages of 10 and 15.

This condition is most commonly seen in just one knee, but in 25% of cases it occurs in both knees.

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Knee Arthritis

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Osteoarthritis of the knee is a condition that can cause pain and alteration of normal biomechanics. To date, the exact causes of osteoarthritis have not yet been fully identified. It is completely normal to have a mild level of osteoarthritis as you age. However, more advanced stages of osteoarthritis can affect the ability to perform physical activities, which may include activities of daily living.

An exacerbation of symptoms usually occurs during a period when the level of physical activity has increased drastically. Direct trauma to the knee can increase symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Treatment of Knee Arthritis consists of Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanics stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the area. 

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

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#KneeInjuries
#Winnipeg
#Chiropractic
#LegInjury
#Arthritis

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IT Band Syndrome

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IT Band Syndrome occurs when a band of connective tissues on the outside of your thigh, called the iliotibial band, becomes irritated as a result of repeated rubbing against the side of your knee during flexion and extension movements.

People who engage in activities or sports that involve jumping, biking or running are at higher risk. This injury is quite frequent among runners.

Normally, this injury occurs during a period when the training intensity and/or volume has been increased too quickly with inadequate recovery.

Treatment of IT Band injuries consists of Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanical stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the area. 

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#HipInjuries
#Winnipeg
#Chiropractic
#LegInjury
#HipPain

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Meniscal Tear

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A meniscal tear is a very common injury among athletes and physical activity enthusiasts.

The menisci are located between the femur and tibia bones. There are two of them, the medial meniscus and the lateral meniscus. They provide shock absorption and additional stability to the knee joint during impact.

A meniscal tear mainly occurs during a sudden pivot with the foot anchored to the ground. In a severe sprain, the meniscal tear is often associated with damage to a cruciate ligament and a collateral ligament. This condition is called the knee triad.

Following a meniscus tear, the prognosis is rather favorable. Rehabilitation for a few months generally makes it possible to regain the physical abilities present before the injury.

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Patellar Tendon Rehab

We have spoken in the past about patellar tendonitis here and that it can be difficult to rehabilitate at times. Recently I saw this tweet that outlines a pretty solid routine to help return normal function and reduce pain in the area. Have a look and discuss it with your health care team to see if it fits your rehab schedule.

Fire @tombroback and follow and like this post; we need more of this on Twitter and less garbage!

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Knee Arthritis

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Knee arthritis is a condition that can cause stiffness that limits joint range of motion. Over time, the knee’s flexion and extension movements become limited, generally causing pain and an alteration of the normal biomechanics. Your thigh muscles also have to work harder during movement, generating a feeling of muscle tension.

To date, the exact causes of osteoarthritis have not been fully identified. It is completely normal to have a mild level of osteoarthritis with age. However, the more advanced stages of osteoarthritis can affect the ability to carry out daily activities and sports. An exacerbation of symptoms usually occurs during a period when the level of physical activity has been drastically increased. Direct trauma to the knee can increase the symptoms of osteoarthritis.

In the knee, the joint affected by osteoarthritis is the t​ibiofemoral joint​, formed by the femur bone and the tibia bone. It is mainly ​cartilage​ damage combined with the presence, in some cases, of slight bone spurs in the joint that appear to be responsible for the restriction of movement. Over time, certain muscles in the thigh area may compensate for the joint restriction and become more tense.

Each person will react differently to osteoarthritis and management will depend on its stage. Knee osteoarthritis can produce, but is not limited to, local pain in the knee, localized edema and stiffness in certain knee movements. Repetitive movements of the knee during walking or other sports activities and a squatting position with direct pressure can cause pain.

Knee osteoarthritis is a progressive condition that cannot be cured, which means that the range of motion may decrease over time. An active lifestyle and a rehabilitation plan may however slow the progression of this condition and make it easier to manage the symptoms.

Relative rest is a good way to prevent your symptoms from getting worse after a painful episode. A few days of rest while reducing activities that cause significant pain​ m​ ay be necessary, but it is very important to avoid deconditioning. A quick return to your daily activities, light cardiovascular exercises that do not cause an increase in pain, joint mobilization exercises and knee and hip muscles strengthening exercises will allow for better recovery.

Class IV Laser is a large part of our treatments. It provides safe and effective, treatment for knee pain and injury. Patients generally respond well to treatments and should notice pain relief after a few treatments. Our treatments use the latest Class IV Lasers and as well as other therapies including myofascial release and acupuncture to help reduce the pain, strengthen the muscles and increase range of motion. Most importantly these treatments help reduce inflammation/swelling, which helps with increasing function, pain relief and speeding up a return to normal life. 

Follow your therapist’s advice. This will help you manage the various stages of the healing process and increase the odds of success. Your therapist will accompany you during your rehabilitation program in order to improve range of motion of your knee’s joint, regain flexibility, muscle strength and endurance, and functional state.

According to the principles of knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation, improving joint range of motion should be an integral part of the treatment plan. A program to improve joint range of motion and flexibility, as well as specific muscle strengthening is common to control the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

Do not rely solely on a passive treatment approach. Each phase of the rehabilitation process is important. Patients who actively participate in their treatment plan tend to recover more quickly. Keep in mind that pain is not always a good indicator of joint or tissue damage. A significant level of pain does not necessarily imply a more advanced stage of osteoarthritis. As soon as you feel better and the pain is well under control, introduce, in collaboration with your therapist, light mobility and strengthening exercises based on your tolerance. Remember that exercise is an excellent way to manage pain associated with osteoarthritis.

Struggling with knee pain? Contact Us for treatment in Winnipeg.

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