Meniscal Tear

Photo by Kindel Media on Pexels.com

A meniscal tear is a very common injury among athletes and physical activity enthusiasts.

The menisci are located between the femur and tibia bones. There are two of them, the medial meniscus and the lateral meniscus. They provide shock absorption and additional stability to the knee joint during impact.

A meniscal tear mainly occurs during a sudden pivot with the foot anchored to the ground. In a severe sprain, the meniscal tear is often associated with damage to a cruciate ligament and a collateral ligament. This condition is called the knee triad.

Following a meniscus tear, the prognosis is rather favorable. Rehabilitation for a few months generally makes it possible to regain the physical abilities present before the injury.

Photo by Towfiqu barbhuiya on Pexels.com

Patellar Tendon Rehab

We have spoken in the past about patellar tendonitis here and that it can be difficult to rehabilitate at times. Recently I saw this tweet that outlines a pretty solid routine to help return normal function and reduce pain in the area. Have a look and discuss it with your health care team to see if it fits your rehab schedule.

Fire @tombroback and follow and like this post; we need more of this on Twitter and less garbage!

Contact us for treatment in Winnipeg

Find and Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

Knee Arthritis

Photo by Towfiqu barbhuiya on Pexels.com

Knee arthritis is a condition that can cause stiffness that limits joint range of motion. Over time, the knee’s flexion and extension movements become limited, generally causing pain and an alteration of the normal biomechanics. Your thigh muscles also have to work harder during movement, generating a feeling of muscle tension.

To date, the exact causes of osteoarthritis have not been fully identified. It is completely normal to have a mild level of osteoarthritis with age. However, the more advanced stages of osteoarthritis can affect the ability to carry out daily activities and sports. An exacerbation of symptoms usually occurs during a period when the level of physical activity has been drastically increased. Direct trauma to the knee can increase the symptoms of osteoarthritis.

In the knee, the joint affected by osteoarthritis is the t​ibiofemoral joint​, formed by the femur bone and the tibia bone. It is mainly ​cartilage​ damage combined with the presence, in some cases, of slight bone spurs in the joint that appear to be responsible for the restriction of movement. Over time, certain muscles in the thigh area may compensate for the joint restriction and become more tense.

Each person will react differently to osteoarthritis and management will depend on its stage. Knee osteoarthritis can produce, but is not limited to, local pain in the knee, localized edema and stiffness in certain knee movements. Repetitive movements of the knee during walking or other sports activities and a squatting position with direct pressure can cause pain.

Knee osteoarthritis is a progressive condition that cannot be cured, which means that the range of motion may decrease over time. An active lifestyle and a rehabilitation plan may however slow the progression of this condition and make it easier to manage the symptoms.

Relative rest is a good way to prevent your symptoms from getting worse after a painful episode. A few days of rest while reducing activities that cause significant pain​ m​ ay be necessary, but it is very important to avoid deconditioning. A quick return to your daily activities, light cardiovascular exercises that do not cause an increase in pain, joint mobilization exercises and knee and hip muscles strengthening exercises will allow for better recovery.

Class IV Laser is a large part of our treatments. It provides safe and effective, treatment for knee pain and injury. Patients generally respond well to treatments and should notice pain relief after a few treatments. Our treatments use the latest Class IV Lasers and as well as other therapies including myofascial release and acupuncture to help reduce the pain, strengthen the muscles and increase range of motion. Most importantly these treatments help reduce inflammation/swelling, which helps with increasing function, pain relief and speeding up a return to normal life. 

Follow your therapist’s advice. This will help you manage the various stages of the healing process and increase the odds of success. Your therapist will accompany you during your rehabilitation program in order to improve range of motion of your knee’s joint, regain flexibility, muscle strength and endurance, and functional state.

According to the principles of knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation, improving joint range of motion should be an integral part of the treatment plan. A program to improve joint range of motion and flexibility, as well as specific muscle strengthening is common to control the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

Do not rely solely on a passive treatment approach. Each phase of the rehabilitation process is important. Patients who actively participate in their treatment plan tend to recover more quickly. Keep in mind that pain is not always a good indicator of joint or tissue damage. A significant level of pain does not necessarily imply a more advanced stage of osteoarthritis. As soon as you feel better and the pain is well under control, introduce, in collaboration with your therapist, light mobility and strengthening exercises based on your tolerance. Remember that exercise is an excellent way to manage pain associated with osteoarthritis.

Struggling with knee pain? Contact Us for treatment in Winnipeg.

Killing time? Try our Twitter and Instagram

Patellar bursitis

Patellar bursitis is the irritation of the bursa in the front of the knee, just below the kneecap. It is covered by the patellar tendon that connects the kneecap to the tibia.

Sports and activities that require the quadriceps muscles to be repeatedly contracted or stretched while running, hiking, or any other extended activity can cause irritation of the bursa and sometimes inflammation. Patellar bursitis may also occur as a result of trauma directly to the knee.

The bursa is a small fluid-filled sac. The bursa, located in the front of the knee below the kneecap, acts as a lubricant to reduce friction between the patellar tendon and the tibia.

Each person will react differently after an injury and recovery will depend on the severity of the injury. Patellar bursitis can produce, but is not limited to pain in the front of the knee, localized edema due to swelling of the bursa and reduced mobility in the knee. Symptoms are usually worse while running, walking on a sloping surface, climbing and descending stairs, and squatting.

Your rehabilitation plan, health profile, fitness level and nutritional status affect the recovery time. In most cases, you can expect a full recovery from patellar bursitis. As a general rule, this condition may take a few months to fully recover.

Class IV Laser is a large part of our treatments. It provides safe and effective, treatment for knee pain and injury. Patients generally respond well to treatments and should notice pain relief after a few treatments. Our treatments use the latest Class IV Lasers and as well as other therapies including myofascial release and acupuncture to help reduce the pain, strengthen the muscles and increase range of motion. Most importantly these treatments help reduce inflammation/swelling, which helps with increasing function, pain relief and speeding up a return to normal life. 

Need more info? Contact Us Here

Want to see cool pics and fun stuff? Here’s our Instagram

Patellofemoral syndrome

Patellofemoral syndrome is an irritation of the articular surface between the kneecap and the femur, your thigh bone, that causes pain under and around the kneecap.

Climbing stairs, running and walking for a prolonged period of time often increases pain. Pain can also be felt after sitting for a long time or squatting.

Patellofemoral pain is more prevalent among young women than men, and more prevalent in the active population.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Generally, the articular cartilage of your kneecap and femur are involved. A weakness of your quadriceps, mostly the internal portion, can be a risk factor. Research also demonstrated the involvement of the fat tissue around your kneecap as a source of pain.

Everyone will react differently after an injury and recovery will depend on the severity of it. Patellofemoral syndrome can cause, but is not limited to, pain at the front of the knee, difficulty with weight-bearing and squatting and sometimes swelling. Pain can also irradiate under and around the knee. Creaking or grinding sensations can occur during physical activity.

Your rehabilitation plan, health, fitness & nutritional status will affect recovery speed. Most of the time, you can expect to recover fully from a patellofemoral syndrome. As a rule of thumb, this condition can take up to three months to fully recover.

Class IV Laser is a large part of our treatments. It provides safe and effective, treatment for knee pain and injury. Patients generally respond well to treatments and should notice pain relief after a few treatments. Our treatments use the latest Class IV Lasers and as well as other therapies including myofascial release and acupuncture to help reduce the pain, strengthen the muscles and increase range of motion. Most importantly these treatments help reduce inflammation/swelling, which helps with increasing function, pain relief and speeding up a return to normal life. 

Relative rest is a good way to protect your knee and prevent further damage, but it’s important to avoid overprotecting your injury. A few days rest with a reduction of activities might be necessary. A quick but progressive return to weight-bearing during your activities of daily living and light cardiovascular exercise that doesn’t cause pain will allow better recovery.

Follow your practitioner’s advice. It will help you manage the different phases of the recovery process and will increase the likelihood of successful rehabilitation. Your practitioner will assist you during your rehabilitation program in order to regain range of motion, strength, endurance and functional status.

As per the principles of rehabilitation for a patellofemoral syndrome, adjusting the volume and intensity of your physical activities is a very important piece for a functional rehabilitation. For this condition, a progressive exercise program performed over a few months period is pretty standard.

Don’t rely on passive treatment only. Each phase of the rehabilitation process is important. Patients that are actively involved in their treatment plan tend to recover faster. Keep in mind that pain is not always a good indicator of tissue damage. As soon as you feel better and the pain is well managed in collaboration with your therapist, you should reintroduce light mobility and strengthening exercises as tolerated.

Stress and Weight 

Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

Bottom Line:

A recent research study found over 75% of people experience at least a moderate amount of stress every day! 

Chronic stress is not fun to deal with, but did you know it can also affect your weight? 

When you are stressed your body goes into survival (or “fight or flight”) mode which changes your hormonal balance. You don’t need to be running from a saber tooth tiger to enter fight or flight mode. Even everyday events like traffic and stress at work can cause you to have that physiological response. 

Why it Matters:

Recent research suggests that chronic stress can result in:

  • high blood pressure,
  • changes in your brain,
  • and weight gain.

When you are stressed out, it is more likely that you will over-eat and less likely that you will get enough sleep and exercise. Stress causes your body to release cortisol, a hormone that can produce a build-up of fatty tissue and cause weight gain. Cortisol increases both your appetite and the amount of fat the body stores. By recognizing your stressors, and engaging in a few simple relaxation techniques, you can learn to reduce your body’s natural stress response. 

  • The hormone Cortisol is released in response to stress and increases your blood sugar.
  • Chronic stress can lead to elevated cortisol levels. 
  • An association has been found between increased cortisol levels and obesity.

Next Steps: 

Relaxation techniques such as meditation, yoga, or even simple breathing exercises can help your body counter the stress response. Also, exercise has been shown to decrease stress levels substantially. 

The next time you are feeling stressed out, take a moment to breathe a few deep breaths and try to get some exercise into your schedule that day. Not only will you feel better mentally, but your body will be able to reduce the amount of Cortisol produced which will limit your body’s fat storage and help curb any thoughts of over-eating. Staying fit and trim does start in your head! 

Science Source(s): 

Hair Cortisol and Adiposity in a Population‐Based Sample of 2,527 Men and Women Aged 54 to 87 Years. Obesity 2017

Laser Therapy For Knee Pain

Laser Therapy For Knee Pain
Laser Therapy For Knee Pain

Those who have knee pain, whether acute or recurring, may find relief in cold laser therapy. This type of laser therapy is a non-invasive procedure that uses a class IV laser to stimulate the affected area and alleviate pain. Research has shown that it can be efficacious in alleviating knee pain whether it’s caused by injury or chronic conditions. Researchers think the lasers aid in healing because they may:

  • Improve circulation
  • Stimulate natural painkillers called endorphins
  • Improve cell regeneration
  • Encourage new tissue growth 

Those who have knee injuries, as well as those who have a knee injury caused by trauma, may be able to benefit from laser therapy. Bone on bone knee pain can be eliminated with a combination of LLLT and physical therapy. The LLLT reduces the irritation and subsequent inflammation of arthritis while the physical therapy strengthens the surrounding muscles and ligaments so that pressure on the joint is reduced.

An injured knee joint can heal faster when LLLT is applied because the body’s healing mechanisms are stimulated and circulation increases. Other types of pain that can be helped with LLLT include:

  • Bursitis
  • Tennis elbow
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia

The time it takes to heal and how long the benefits lasts will vary by the individual. Currently, there is no cure for arthritis or similar bone diseases. However, LLLT can provide relief from the symptoms and improve quality of life for those who have a degenerative bone disease in their knees. For some, the use of LLLT can enable them to begin to exercise and lose weight, which can often alleviate much of the knee pain of arthritis and other conditions.

If you have knee pain and would like to try laser therapy in Winnipeg, feel free to contact us at 204-586-8424.

Why trigger point therapy?

People often think of a massage as a relaxing experience, something they might do occasionally, or give as a gift along with a trip to the spa. Trigger point massage therapy is another kind of massage used to treat pain and physical dysfunction. Trigger points can develop in people from all walks of life. They can affect people of all ages, office workers and labourers, elite and weekend athletes, post surgical patients, people with acute pain from injury and people with chronic pain. Trigger point massage therapy can treat a wide variety of physical conditions such as:

– Migraines

– back pain.

– sciatica

– Carple tunnel syndrome

– achy persistent pain

– pain from Fibromyalgia

– post surgical pain and scarring

– soft tissue injuries related to sports

– TMJ dysfunction

Myofascial trigger points and pain.

TP’s were first brought to the attention of the medical world by Dr. Janet G. Travell. Dr. Travell, physician to President John F. Kennedy, is the acknowledged Mother of Myofascial Trigger Points. In fact, “Trigger Point massage, the most effective modality used by massage therapists for the relief of pain, is based almost entirely on Dr. Travell’s insights.”2 Dr. Travell’s partner in her research was Dr. David G. Simons, a research scientist and aerospace physician.

Trigger Points are very common. In fact, Travell and Simons state that TP’s are responsible for, or associated with, 75% of pain complaints or conditions.1 With this kind of prevalence, it’s no wonder that TP’s are often referred to as the “scourge of mankind”.

Trigger Points can produce a wide variety of pain complaints. Some of the most common are migraine headaches, back pain, and pain and tingling into the extremities. They are usually responsible for most cases of achy deep pain that is hard to localize.

A TP will refer pain in a predictable pattern, based on its location in a given muscle. Also, since these spots are bundles of contracted muscle fibres, they can cause stiffness and a decreased range of motion. Chronic conditions with many TP’s can also cause general fatigue and malaise, as well as muscle weakness.