Elbow Sprain

Photo by Sergey Makashin on Pexels.com

An elbow sprain is a stretch, or a partial or complete tear of the ligaments connecting the bone in the arm, called the humerus, to those in the forearm, called the radius and ulna.

This type of sprain usually occurs from a direct elbow strike, during a tackle while playing a contact sport. A sprain can also occur from a fall on an outstretched arm.

Treatment of elbow sprains consists of Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanics stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the arm. 

#LaserTherapy
#ArmInjuries
#Winnipeg
#Chiropractic

Contact Us

Instagram

Golfer’s Elbow

Golf Elbow.png

Most of the muscles that flex your wrist are attached to a bony bump on the inside of your elbow called the “medial epicondyle.” Sometimes, through injury or overuse, the site where these muscles originate can become irritated or inflamed. This condition is called “medial epicondylitis”, or “golfer’s elbow.”

Although the condition is named “golfer’s elbow,” over 90% of those affected are not even athletes, much less golfers. Nonetheless, the condition is more common in certain sports, especially golf, throwing, bowling, football, archery, and weight lifting. Occupations that require heavy gripping or repeated hand movements, like carpentry or typing, can predispose you to this condition. Smokers and people who are obese are more likely to experience this condition.

Medial epicondylitis is the most frequent cause of pain on the “inside” of your elbow but is 3-10 times less likely that its “outside” counterpart- lateral epicondylitis (i.e. “tennis elbow”). Medial epicondylitis is most common between the ages of 40 and 60. The condition strikes the dominant arm in over 3⁄4 of cases. Your symptoms will likely include a dull aching pain over the bump on the inside of your elbow that becomes more intense with use. As the condition progresses, you may notice grip weakness or limitations when shaking hands, grasping objects, and opening jars. Be sure to tell your doctor if you notice numbness or tingling traveling toward your hand.

 

If left untreated, medial epicondylitis can last indefinitely. Studies show that up to 40% of untreated patients suffer prolonged discomfort, some as long as three years. Fortunately, conservative treatment like the type provided in our office is effective for relieving this condition. Our office may prescribe an elbow “counterforce brace” to help dampen stress to the irritated area. This type of brace should not be used in patients who have numbness or tingling radiating into their fingers. Some patients may benefit from a “wrist splint” that is used at night to allow your tendon to heal in a lengthened position. Using ice or ice massage over your elbow can help limit pain. Your home exercises will play an important role in your recovery.

Initially, you may need to avoid activities that cause an increase in pain, like gripping, lifting, golfing, throwing balls, or swinging a racquet. Be sure to warm up properly and stretch prior to any heavy physical activity. Smokers would benefit from quitting. Overweight patients should consider increasing their aerobic activity to shed excess pounds.

If you or someone you know suffers from this condition, call our office today. Our doctors are experts at relieving many types of pain including elbow injuries.

Contact us for treatment in Winnipeg

Find and Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

Tennis Elbow

Lateral epicondylalgia, also called tennis elbow, is an irritation of the wrist extensor muscles.

This condition can affect people performing repetitive and excessive wrist extension movements such as when playing racquet sports like tennis, doing manual labour and working at a computer.

Generally, this overuse injury develops over a few weeks or a few months period.

Treatment of Tennis Elbow consists of Acupuncture, Class IV Laser Therapy, management of any biomechanics stresses in the area and exercise rehabilitation to address any weaknesses that can be putting undue stress on the area. 

#LaserTherapy
#ArmInjuries
#Winnipeg
#Chiropractic
#Acupuncture
#Tennis Elbow

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Tennis Elbow

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Lateral epicondylalgia, also called tennis elbow, is an irritation of the wrist extensor muscles. This condition can affect people performing repetitive motions of the wrist and arm, such as tennis players. Symptoms include pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow.

Tennis elbow is a common overuse injury that often develops gradually over a period of weeks or months. The condition is characterized by pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow, which may worsen with certain activities or movements.

If you’re dealing with lateral epicondylalgia, know that most people fully recover from this condition. As a general guideline, it can take a few months to recover completely. Of course, this varies from person to person – some may recover more quickly, while others may take longer.

Class IV Laser is a large part of our treatments. It provides safe and effective, treatment for elbow pain and injury. Patients generally respond well to treatments and should notice pain relief after a few treatments. Our treatments use the latest Class IV Lasers and as well as other therapies including myofascial release and acupuncture to help reduce the pain, strengthen the muscles and increase range of motion. Most importantly these treatments help reduce inflammation/swelling, which helps with increasing function, pain relief and speeding up a return to normal life. 

Looking for more info or needing treatment in Winnipeg? Contact Us

Check us out on Twitter and Instagram! We love follows, likes and comments!

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Thoracic outlet syndrome is a collection of symptoms of pain and numbness that can extend from the neck area to the hand.

Symptoms often result from the compression of nerve and blood structures in the space between the scalene muscles in the neck, collarbone and first rib.

Thoracic outlet syndrome occurs more often in people who perform repetitive activities above the shoulders such as swimming, racquet sports or simply in manual workers. This syndrome is more common in women than in men.

Nerves and blood vessels in the space between the muscles of the neck, collarbone and first rib are often involved in this condition.

A fracture of the collarbone, altered posture, a supernumerary rib or overdeveloped chest muscles can lead to thoracic outlet syndrome.

Symptoms depend on which vascular or nerve structures are compressed. Thoracic outlet syndrome can produce, but is not limited to, pain in the neck, shoulder, arm or hand. Symptoms may also include numbness in the forearm and some fingers. People may also experience a feeling of weakness on the affected side.

Compression of the blood vessels may cause a decrease in blood flow to the arm, resulting in increased swelling and redness in that arm. Symptoms usually appear or increase when the arms are extended, or held high above the shoulders for a period of time. They are often more acute at night.

Your rehabilitation plan, health profile and fitness level affect the recovery time. In most cases, you can expect a full recovery from thoracic outlet syndrome. Recovery will depend on the severity of the compression.

A few days of rest by reducing activities that cause pain may be necessary. A gradual return to your daily activities, light cardiovascular exercise and mobility and strengthening exercises will allow for better recovery.

Follow your therapist’s advice. This will help you manage the various stages of the healing process and increase the odds of successful rehabilitation. Your therapist will accompany you during your rehabilitation program to help you regain optimal posture, joint range of motion, muscle flexibility, muscle endurance and functional status.

According to the principles of thoracic outlet syndrome, improving posture and reducing muscle tension would be two important elements for functional recovery. A progressive rehabilitation program over a period of a few weeks is quite common.Do not rely solely on a passive treatment approach. Each phase of the rehabilitation process is important. Patients who actively participate in their treatment plan tend to recover more quickly. Remember that pain is not always a good indicator of tissue damage. As soon as you feel better and the pain is well under control, introduce, in collaboration with your therapist, light and progressive exercises based on your tolerance.

Acupuncture and Tennis Elbow

Acupuncture for tennis elbow

#Acupuncture treatment has been shown to help provide significant pain relief for tennis elbow.

Acupuncture treatment can help to reduce inflammation and improve blood flow to injured areas to aid and speed healing of various types of tendonitis. Pain in the outer elbow or forearm pain are signs of tennis elbow.

Dr. Natalie Carriere is now offering Acupuncture treatment at #AberdeenChiropractic. Call 204-586-8424 today for your initial consultation and treatment!

#Pain

#PainRelief

#Health

#Wellness

#Winnipeg

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
Impingement syndrome
Impingement syndrome is an irritation of the structures between the upper portion of your arm and your shoulder blade mainly during overhead arm movements.The rotator cuff is comprised of four muscles that help position the humerus, your upper arm bone, into the shoulder socket during arm movement.The shoulder has great mobility but at the same time is prone to injury during falls or accident, or when there is a lack of motor control (altered biomechanics).Men over 40 performing manual labour are the most affected with this condition. It is also present in young athletes practicing sports involving repeated overhead motion such as swimming, baseball or tennis.

▬▬▬▬▬

Structures involved

The tendons of the rotator cuff, ligaments of your shoulder and subacromial bursa are the most commonly affected structures. The subacromial space gets smaller during overhead movements. This can cause, over time, irritation, inflammation and/or a lesion of the rotator cuff tendons.

page1image3462066528

▬▬▬▬▬

Signs & Symptoms that you may experience

Everyone will react differently after an injury and recovery will depend on the severity of it.

Impingement syndrome can cause but is not limited to, pain at the front of the shoulder and localized swelling. Pain or tightness is often felt when you lift your arm overhead or when you lower it from an elevated position. Pain can also be felt around your shoulder blade in your back.

Other early symptoms can include light pain with activities or during rest and in some cases, irradiating pain around your shoulder. In severe cases, you might feel pain at night and a loss of strength or range of motion. Impingement syndrome can lead to rotator cuff tendinitis or shoulder bursitis when left untreated.

▬▬▬▬▬

Recovery

Your rehabilitation plan, health, fitness & nutritional status will affect recovery speed. Most of the time, you can expect to recover fully from impingement syndrome. As a rule of thumb, this condition can take up to three months to fully recover.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

▶ WHAT TO DO

Early Stage

Relative rest is a good way to protect your shoulder and prevent further damage, but it’s important to avoid overprotecting your injury. A few days rest where you avoid pain-inducing movement and activities might be necessary. A quick but progressive return to your activities of daily living, light cardiovascular exercise and specific range of motion and strengthening exercises will allow better recovery.

Rehabilitation

Follow your practitioner’s advice. It will help you manage the different phases of the recovery process and will increase the likelihood of successful rehabilitation. Your practitioner will assist you during your rehabilitation program in order to regain your normal range of motion, strength and endurance, optimal motor control and functional status.

As per the principles of rehabilitation for impingement syndrome, movement training through therapeutic exercises is an important part of functional recovery. A progressive exercise program performed over a few weeks period is pretty standard.

▶ WHAT TO AVOID

Don’t rely on passive treatment only. Each phase of the rehabilitation process is important. Patients that are actively involved in their treatment plan tend to recover faster. Keep in mind that pain is not always a good indicator of tissue damage. As soon as you feel better and the pain is well managed in collaboration with your therapist, you should reintroduce light strengthening exercises as tolerated.

Shoulder Labrum Tear

Shoulder Labrum Tear

Shoulder labrum tear

A labral tear represents a tear of the labrum, which is a piece of fibrocartilage (rubbery soft tissue) attached to the rim of the shoulder socket that helps keep the ball of the joint in place.

The shoulder is the most mobile joint in the human body, but this great mobility comes at the expense of stability and increased injury risk.

A labral tear may occur slowly over time or suddenly as the result of accidents such as a motor vehicle accident, a fall on an outstretched arm or a shoulder dislocation. People who participate in repetitive overhead sports, such as throwing athletes, are more prone to suffer from a labral tear.

▬▬▬▬▬

Structures involved

The shoulder joint is comprised of three bones: the upper arm bone called the humerus, the shoulder blade and the collarbone. The link between the arm and the torso is done between the humerus and the shoulder blade. The humerus rests in a shallow socket on the side of the shoulder blade called the glenoid cavity and the labrum helps to add depth to this socket, making the joint more stable.

In the presence of a labral tear caused by repetitive movements, muscles of the rotator cuff, a group of muscles stabilizing the shoulder, are often also irritated.

1

▬▬▬▬▬

Signs & Symptoms that you may experience with Shoulder Labrum Tear

Everyone will react differently after an injury and recovery will depend on the severity of it. A tear of the labrum can cause but is not limited to, pain at the front of the shoulder, a feeling that your shoulder is coming out of its socket, weakness of the arm and limited range of motion. Pain is often felt when trying to lift the arm overhead. Clicking or cracking sounds can sometimes be heard when moving the arm, with a catching sensation in your shoulder.

It is also possible to feel pain during the night when sleeping on the affected shoulder.

▬▬▬▬▬

Recovery

Your rehabilitation plan, health, fitness & nutritional status will affect recovery speed. There are multiple types of labrum tears but the most common is called a superior labrum anterior and posterior tear (SLAP).

Most of the time, you can expect to recover functionally from a labrum tear. This means that even though the tear might still be there, you will be able to perform your activities of daily living without pain. It can take a few months to get back to your pre-tear functional level.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

▶ WHAT TO DO with Shoulder Labrum Tear

Early Stage

Relative rest is a good way to protect your shoulder and prevent further damage, but it’s important to avoid overprotecting your injury. A few days rest where you avoid pain-inducing movement and activities might be necessary. A quick but progressive return to your activities of daily living, light cardiovascular exercise and specific range of motion and strengthening exercises will allow better recovery.

Rehabilitation

Follow your practitioner’s advice. It will help you manage the different phases of the recovery process and will increase the likelihood of successful rehabilitation. Your practitioner will assist you during your rehabilitation program in order to regain your normal range of motion, strength and endurance, optimal motor control and functional status.

As per the principles of rehabilitation for a labrum tear, movement rehabilitation and relearning through therapeutic exercises is an important part of functional recovery. A progressive exercise program performed over a few weeks period is pretty standard.

▶ WHAT TO AVOID

Don’t rely on passive treatment only. Each phase of the rehabilitation process is important. Patients that are actively involved in their treatment plan tend to recover faster. Keep in mind that pain is not always a good indicator of tissue damage. As soon as you feel better and the pain is well managed in collaboration with your therapist, you should reintroduce light strengthening exercises as tolerated.

Learn About Laser Therapy

Check Out Our Twitter